2012-38th Conference Program & Presenters



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 Conference Program

The Great Renewal:
Rebuilding Our Nation--Visions and Challenges


8am to 9am

Registration and Continental Breakfast
Poster Sessions
Publishers

9am – 9:15am

Welcome & Introductions



9:15am-9:35am
The Great Renewal—Lessons from the Past and Direction for the Future   
       Rosalyn M. King, Chair, ECCSSA and Professor of Psychology, Northern Virginia Community College-Loudoun

View Presentation: The_Great_Renewal_Lessons_from_the_Past_and_Direction.pdf

This presentation will address, The Great Renewal, and reviews other times in history that devastation, turmoil and upheaval was experienced in society and world. The presentation will review past and current events, and look into the future; and, calls for remembrance and recapturing the human spirit, rebuilding, revitalization, access, advancement and transformation. This includes: transformational governance and the rebuilding of the nation’s infrastructure; development of human potential and the creation of opportunities for growth; and, transformational paradigm shifts at all levels and across disciplines in higher education.


9:35am-10:45am

Historical Perspectives
Facilitator:  Curtis F. Morgan, Professor of History, Lord Fairfax Community College, Middletown, VA

Leadership and Citizenship in Early Western Civilization: Using Case Studies to Enhance the Civic Awareness of Community College Students
    Joseph Esposito, Adjunct Professor of History, Northern Virginia Community College-Loudoun

Too often students fail to appreciate the opportunity to learn from past societies in order to better understand and participate in the contemporary world.  One very significant deficiency in American society today is appreciating the merits of good leadership and citizenship.  Early Western civilization can be very instructive.  This presentation will look at how students can profit from studying the political achievements of Cyrus the Great, Darius the Great, Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, Augustus and Charlemagne.   It also will examine the way in which citizenship and law matured under the Mesopotamians, Hebrews, Athenians, Romans, Byzantines and the English in the High Middle Ages.  Extrapolations will be made.

Learning from Lincoln
Steven S. Berizzi, Professor, History and Political Science, Norwalk Community College, Norwalk, Ct.

View Presentation: Steven_Berizzi_Learning_from_Lincoln_PowerPoint__ECCSA_3-30-12_.pdf

About 150 years ago, President Abraham Lincoln led the nation through the greatest crisis in its history, the Civil War.  His presidency offers a powerful example of how one person with vision – initially, preservation of the Union and, later, the abolition of slavery – can provide effective leadership even during the most challenging times.

The Resurrection of Nat Turner—A Shifting Historical Perspective
Sharon Ewell Foster, Author, Speaker, Trainer, Durham, North Carolina

View Presentation: Nat_Turner_Shifting_Historical_Perspective-Sharon_Ewell_Foster.pdf

For 180 years, Thomas Gray’s The Confessions of Nat Turner--purported to be an admission of guilt given by the historical figure, Nat Turner, and read aloud at his trial—has been the primary document for conducting research on the slave revolt leader. Author Sharon Ewell Foster’s groundbreaking research challenges the validity of Gray’s account, calls for more in-depth analysis of handwritten source materials, and offers a new perspective on the slave preacher’s identity and the antebellum search for liberty and dignity. Sharon Ewell Foster will briefly share her research journey to find the real Nat Turner; the story behind what she believes is a 180 year old cover-up, and strategies for using this new story as a bridge of understanding between communities. (Books: The Truth about Nat Turner, Parts 1 and 2.)  Visit her website at: www.theresurrectionofnatturner.com.


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10:45am-12:00 Noon

Policies and Strategies for Renewal—National and Global
Facilitator: David Smith, J.D., Senior Program Officer, United States
Institute of Peace

Renewing a Fragmented Society: A Social Systems Re-Design Prospectus
Michael H. Parsons, Adjunct Professor, Community College Leadership and Interdisciplinary Higher Education Doctoral Studies and Ro’Shaun Bailey, Graduate Student, Interdisciplinary Higher Education, Morgan State University.

View Presentation: Strat_Policy_change_mgt.__Mgt_2.pdf

American social institutions are experiencing significant deterioration. Kagan (Harvard, 2009) presented a series of insights focusing on
 re-integrating the institutions. His most important insight is the need to be able to tolerate ambiguity. His insights blend effectively
with the work of Bennis, Goleman and O’Toole (Transparency: How leaders Create a Culture of Candor, 2008) The presenters will
synthesize these theories then demonstrate how the current Upward Bound leadership training program develops leaders who are
 able to tolerate ambiguity, demonstrate candor in interpersonal interaction and be transparent in leading, working with peers
and followers. Participants will share experiences that reinforce or contrast with the proposed re-design prospectus.


Conservative Immigration Reform as a Case of Illegal Immigration Reform and the Immigrant’s Responsibility Act of 1996
Huiyun Tang, Visiting Scholar, UVA and Doctoral Candidate at East China Normal University

View Presentation: conservative_reform_as_an_example_of_illegal_immigration_and_control_act_of_1996-Tang.pdf

In 1996, congress enacted Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrants Responsibility Act of 1996. Actually, it is a conservative
 legislation. It only tightens border control but also strictly limits the public benefits about illegal immigration. Several reasons can
account for its conservatism: one reason is the increase of illegal immigration, the other is the influence of 187 Act, and the third reason is
 political camping, including congress election and president campaign. In practice, does it work? In fact, it did not control illegal
immigration and influence the benefits legal migrants.  Therefore, Congress should compressively consider immigration reform.


Human Dignity and International Humanitarian Law: Strengthening Our Nation and the World by Educating Global Thinkers and Citizen Leaders
Laurie Fisher, Senior Associate, International Humanitarian Law Dissemination, International Services, American
  Red Cross and Breyette Lorntz, PhD, International Activities-Health and Safety, International Humanitarian Law Education, American Red Cross.

View Presentation: EHL-_Flexible_Teaching_Resoures_for_the_Social_Sciences_-_Fisher_and_Lorntz.pdf

Few American youth are aware of the existence of international humanitarian law, (IHL) universal laws with origins in American history - that limit military conduct and protect the human dignity of vulnerable people in times of armed conflict. A recent survey about the
attitudes of the post-9/11 generation in the United States identified a contradiction between support for illegal acts in war and
 a desire among young people to learn more revealing a knowledge gap.  To become empowered global citizens and leaders,
students today need a solid understanding of IHL to navigate, question and understand the complex global issues related to
 war and the rights and protections of people affected by it.

This presentation will describe results from the survey described above and will introduce IHL in historical and contemporary
 contexts. A robust curriculum, appropriate for use in multiple disciplines within community colleges will also be presented.


12:00 Noon-1:00pm
Lunch

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1:00pm-1:50pm

Rebuilding Social Systems
Facilitator: Jodi Cavanaugh, Esquire, Family and Domestic Law, Baltimore, MD

Rebuilding Criminal Justice Systems: Abolition of Capital Punishment is the First Step
Dr. Sanaz Alasti-Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Lamar University, Beaumont TX

View Presentation: Alsasti.ECCSSA.pdf

This presentation explores the question of what constitute the harshest method of punishment in criminal justice systems.
 It reviews the story of death penalty in both secular and religious criminal justice systems, focusing on the current practice
of capital punishment and execution methods, and examines the abolition of capital punishment in light of the international law.


Theoretical Approaches to Shrinking Cities in Mexico partnerships Between Governments, Firms, Communities, and New Social Movements
Jose G. Vargas-Hernandez, Research Professor, University Center of Economic and Managerial Sciences,
University of Guadalajara, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico

View Presentation:
Analysis_of_Theoretical_Approaches_to_Shrinking_Cities_in_Mexico-Vargas-Hernandez.pdf

Long Version:
THEORETICAL_APPROACHES_TO_SHRINKING_CITIES_IN_Copia_.pdf

This presentation discusses the theoretical approaches to shrinking cities in Mexico. The study of tendencies in economic and
environmental shrinkage is tied to the expressions of substantive changes in the complexity of determinant contexts of internal
 and migration flows. Population mobility is the strategic rational response of survival in an instable economic, social and political
 environment.  At the same time, it is important to analyze the tendencies according to the economic changes using the theories and
models and no to fall down victim of simplistic projections and conjectures or resound theories based more in speculation than in
 facts. In general terms, the situation of shrinking cities in México does not follow the same patterns of well developed countries,
 where an increase in shrinking cities occurs since the middle of the 1950s and the use of incentives in some localities to attract
economic growth have had modest success to turn around the shrinking process. Further research on shrinking cities should be
 done in México. The presentation will discuss some of the issues and problems important to setting an agenda for
future research in Mexico.


1:50pm-3:00pm

Lessons Learned
Facilitator:  Joseph Esposito, Professor of History and Military Studies,
American Public University and Northern VA Community College

The Kilimanjaro Porters and Guides: My Motivational Inspiration
Karen Jolley, Instructor of Psychology, Central Georgia Technical College

View Presentation: Jolley_Kilimanjaro_Presentation.pdf

In June of 2011, I climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, the highest mountain in Africa and the highest free-standing
mountain in the world.  While I expected my trip to be a great adventure, I did not anticipate the many ways in which my
 life would change as a result of my trek up the mountain.  While in Tanzania, I met many genuinely kind and helpful people
that made me feel welcome and a part of their African culture.  The individuals who touched my heart and had the greatest impact
on my life were the porters and guides of Kilimanjaro.  The porters and guides brave men who trek Kili each day, encouraging
 climbers and providing the necessities all the way up.  Since returning from Africa, I have used the story of the porters and
guides in my classroom as an example of strong work ethics; and, as an example of how lessons we learn from individuals in
 a different culture can have the potential to change our lives here in the United States.  


Holding History in Two Hands: Principles and Foundations of World Civilizations
Curtis F. Morgan, Professor of History, Lord Fairfax Community College, Middletown, VA

View Presentation: History_in_Two_Hands-Curtis_Morgan.pdf

I wish to share with the audience my framework for teaching World Civilizations. My approach is topical, and revolves
around “5 Principles of Civilization” (factors that all civilizations at all times have in common) and “5 Foundations of
the Modern World” (transforming discoveries, ideas, processes that have created and sustain the “Modern World System”
we all live in).  These tools (derived from years of reading, study, and thought) have served well with generations of college
students by giving them a conceptual framework in which to place the facts and events of history and current events,
as well as a way to evaluate and understand diverse cultures and the world as a whole.

Promoting Reasoned Political Dialogue Using the Philosophical Foundations of the U.S. Federal Government as Example
John P. McGuinness, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Philosophy, NVCC-Annandale

View Presentation: ENLIGHTENED_REPUBLIC-McGuinness.pdf

The U.S. Federal Government is based on the U.S. Constitution as inspired in part by the Declaration of Independence.  
The underlying ideology is derived from the political philosophers of the Enlightenment (Lucka, Montesquieu, Rousseau and Hobbes).
 This framework provided a common perspective for the participants in the Constitutional Convention and fostered
the rational dialogue necessary to produce the constitution and obtain its ratification.  An overview of this
intellectual history behind the formation of the U.S. Government will provide an example of the kind of reasoned discourse
that the contemporary American political process so sorely lacks.

3:00pm-3:10pm
BREAK

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3:10pm-4:00pm

The Role of Media
Facilitator: Ms. Kasi Williams, MBA, Information Technology, Morgan State University


The Impact of Social Media on Today’s Generation
Illeah Lewis, Student, Liberty University and Kevin Lewis, CEO/Managing Partner of LMK Partners, LLC

Presentation will focus on the many different sources of social media while expanding on social media’s negative
 and positive effects on effective communication. This incudes personal experiences as well as observations and research.
We challenge today’s generation to sharpen their communication skills, as that is the making or breaking point for all careers. Since communication will be the main focus of this presentation, examine advantages, and disadvantages of how saturated our
society has become in social media. Reflections are offered on why social media is important, but also why it should be
used to better today’s generation’s communication skills.

Digital Media and Disruptive Education
Nelson J. Ginebra, Content Creator and Instructor, Canvas Digital Media and Montgomery Community College, Rockville Campus

View Presentation: A_Disruptive_Education_PPT-Ginebra.pdf

This presentation focuses on how digital multimedia creation can re-enforce core subject areas such as Language Arts,
 Math and Science by enhancing instruction across the academic curriculum. The use, implementation and creation of
multimedia content helps re-enforce the curriculum by augmenting and cross-referencing instruction in language
 arts-storytelling, writing, researching skills, critical thinking, and information synthesis. Other subject areas that can
 also be re-enforced are math, computer science, and digital literacy skills. By integrating this technology further into
 the curriculum, educators will also be able to encourage and develop a greater emphasis on right brain thinking
and authorship/ownership of ideas.

4:00pm-5:10pm

Transformations in Higher Education
Facilitator:  R. Lee Viar IV, Professor, Business, Administration and Management and
Community College Leadership, Colorado Technical, Strayer and Morgan State Universities



Student Roles and Responsibilities in College/University
Anny A. Ojekwe, Adjunct Professor, NVCC-Loudoun

The aim of the presentation is to articulate the set of issues, which today’s college and university bound
students must address in order to lessen the frustrations and challenges of attending college or university.  Student’s
roles and responsibilities have always been essential part of higher education and in recent years, have become core
essential part of excelling in college or university.  The paper will examine student’s precollege orientation, study
habits and socio-cultural influences.  The discussion will be conducted using evidential observations, detailed and
written work and research findings as an analytical framework. This concept will also be used as a platform to suggest
 some study habits and principles that would enable college/university bound students to excel.

Complex Systems Science: The Coming Revolution in Economics and in the Social Sciences Classroom
Dipak K. (Dee) Roy, Adjunct Instructor of Economics, NVCC-Woodbridge and Ian Taylor, Adjunct Professor of Economics, VCCS

View Presentation: ECCSSA_Conference_The_Coming_Revolution_in_Economics_-Roy_and_Taylor.pdf

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Complex systems science is beginning to enter the social sciences, including economics.   A revolution is brewing as dynamic
network and agent-based systems are understood and applied.   The impact of dynamic complex systems driven by the
convergence of IT, media and communications is already profound in our global society.   Application to economic theory and
models is especially important as a driver of transformational policy recommendations and ultimately of politics.   Central bankers and
academic economists are just beginning to explore complex systems theories and tools as keys to understanding the structural
changes in the global economy, how endogenous (man-made) shocks are amplified through global financial network
interconnections—and to find mapping tools and effective ways to deal with contagion.    Social science instructors
and researchers should be aware of the new theories and applications in their disciplines.   Their evolution is
interdisciplinary—from mathematics, sociology, biology and epidemiology.  The presenters describe how to
introduce these new factors into the classroom and introduce on-line resources.   


5:10pm-6:00pm

Innovative Instructional Strategies in Teaching and Learning
Facilitator: Bernadette M. Black, University of Virginia, Interdisciplinary Studies


My Sociology: Transforming Classroom Culture from a Focus on Grades to a Focus on Learning
David l. Strickland, Associate Professor of Sociology, East Georgia College, Swainsboro, GA

View Presentation: STRICKLAND_ECCSSA_presentation.pdf

This presentation documents a pedagogical remodeling of the Introduction to Sociology course to one that transforms
 the culture of higher education from a focus on grades to a focus on learning. The transformation is accomplished through a
series of learning activities embodied in the My Sociology textbook which has been designed to be not merely learner-centered
but ego-centered. In fifteen years of teaching I have observed that students perk up when the lesson is about them. Taking
advantage of this energy, the discussion of sociology starts with a treatment of the self, and then branches out systematically
 to the global perspective. Experimental model research comparing this teaching strategy to the traditional model has shown
this strategy to be statistically significantly more effective (p < .001).


Including Prosocial Values within Your Regular Curriculum
Julie Carvalho, Adjunct Professor, Psychology, NVCC-Loudoun

Values are the GPS of personal and career life.  When values are aligned with decisions made by individuals and groups,
 the results are healthy for the person and the group.  When values are misaligned with decisions, negative consequences
 such as cognitive dissonance can cause problems for society.  Prosocial values are those which are healthy for individuals and society.
 When students can discern their prosocial values and connect them with personal and career choices, the college promotes
 healthy decision making.  The author has developed several modules for students to discern their values and discuss
implications for decision making.  Examples will permit audience members to decide which modules may work in their disciplines.  
The process can help renew and rebuild our nation’s visions.


6:00pm-6:30pm

Summary and Closing Reflections
Conference Facilitators

6:30pm
Beverages and Desserts
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9am to 6pm
Breezeway-CIT

Poster Presentations

Human Dignity and International Humanitarian Law: Educating Global Thinkers and Citizen Leaders
Laurie Fisher, Senior Associate, International Humanitarian Law Education, American Red Cross

This poster presentation will respond to this year’s conference focus on repairing a fragmented world by sharing key results from a
recent survey on the attitudes of the post-9/11 generation in the United States about universal rules to limit the conduct of war
 and protect the vulnerable.  Highlights from a robust curriculum, appropriate for use in multiple disciplines within community
 colleges will be shared, including examples from students and educators.

Peace Psychology
Rhonda Williams, Student, Northern Virginia Community College, Loudoun Campus, Sterling, VA

This poster presents the new subfield in psychology and new paradigm promoting peace, pioneers and
strategies for resolving domestic, national and global conflicts.

Hope for the Future—Moving People Forward with Positive Psychology
      Rhonda Williams, Student, Psychology Club, Northern Virginia Community College, Loudoun Campus,    

This poster introduces the new paradigm in psychology that will move across disciplines on
promoting a positive paradigm of thinking, practice and learning from a positive perspective.
Positive psychology will change the way we think, act, live, teach, learn and provide clinical practice.




Publishers

Macmillan Higher Education Publishing Group, Inc.
Bedford Books/St. Martin’s Press, WH Freeman & Co., & Worth Publishers
 David Kennedy, Representative

Oxford University Press, Inc.
Karlyn Hixson, Representative





Biographical Overview of Facilitators and Presenters

 Conference Facilitators


Dr. Bernadette M. Black
University of Virginia, Interdisciplinary Studies


Bernadette M. Black dedicated her 40 working years to higher education as a counselor, professor, administrator, and professional development advocate. Retired from full-time service, Bernadette continues to work part-time and to teach graduate classes for the University of Virginia.

Her professional experience includes 9 years as Director of UVA's Social Foundations Program at the Northern Virginia Center in Falls Church, 6 years as Director of Professional Development for Virginia's Community College System where she created and implemented a nationally award winning program for faculty in Virginia's 23 community colleges. And, for 17 years she directly served a diverse student population as counselor and professor at Northern Virginia Community College's Alexandria Campus.

Bernadette is a National Certified Counselor and her doctorate was earned from UVA in counselor education.  She has published numerous articles and has facilitated presentations on student-centered learning, creating responsive professional development programs, evaluation of teaching, building learning communities, and developing individual development plans.  Her book, Training for Life: A Practical Guide to Career and Life Planning (10th edition) serves as a valuable resource for transitioning adults.

Currently, she resides in Vienna, Virginia with her husband, Tom, where she continues to cultivate the individual aspirations of their six children, their spouses, and grandchildren.



Ms. Jodi Cavanaugh, Esquire
Private Practice, Family and Domestic Law, Diversity and Equal Employment Opportunity, Baltimore, MD


Hello my name is Jodi A. Cavanaugh and I am an attorney and a Research Assistant for the Community College Leadership Program at Morgan State University, a Historically Black University in Baltimore, Maryland.   Last year (Spring 2011) I completed my coursework in the Higher Education Doctoral Program and am continuing to pursue my goal to obtain a PhD in Higher Education. While attending Morgan State University, I continue to practice law. I earned my Juris Doctorate at the University of Maryland and my bachelor’s degree at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.


Joseph A. Esposito
American Public University and Northern Virginia Community College


Joseph Esposito has had a long career in the fields of public service, education, communications, and nonprofit work. He served in three presidential administrations, most recently as Deputy Under Secretary for International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Education.  Among other government assignments was an eleven-year period at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he served as the agency’s Narcotics Affairs Coordinator and in other roles.  He was a working group chair for the Commission for Assistance to a Free Cuba, which submitted its report to President Bush in 2004.

Mr. Esposito also has been Director of Research at the Cardinal Newman Society and, later, the first Director of its Center for the Study of Catholic Higher Education.  At that nonprofit, he was the editor and principal writer of The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College, which was published in 2007.  He also has been a full-time writer.Since 2005 he has taught 134 undergraduate history classes, both online and in the classroom.  He is a full-time faculty member in the history and military studies department at American Public University and an adjunct faculty member at Northern Virginia Community College.  He teaches courses in Western and Eastern civilizations, world history, Asian history, and historical research methods.  

He also periodically teaches in the graduate Social Foundations of Education program at the University of Virginia’s Northern Virginia Center.
Mr. Esposito received his undergraduate degree in history (Phi Beta Kappa) from The Pennsylvania State University.  He holds master’s degrees from The Pennsylvania State University, George Mason University, Georgetown University, University of Pennsylvania and the University of Virginia.  He has undertaken doctoral work in history at American University.

He is a strong believer in ongoing professional development, completing many workshops and informal classes.  He was a participant in the 2011 Virginia Master Teacher Seminar.

Dr. Rosalyn M.  King
Eastern Community Colleges Social Science Association, Chair


Rosalyn M. King is professor of psychology at NVCC-Loudoun and VCCS Chair, Center for Teaching Excellence, Northern Virginia Region. She is also adjunct research professor at Capella University in the doctoral program in Advanced Studies in Human Behavior, Harold Abel School of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. King serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of ECCSSA. She received her doctoral training at Harvard University in Learning Environments and Administration, Planning and Social Policy, with special study in the Harvard Law School (Constitutional Law, Intellectual Property Law, Commerce and Development) and the School of Design (Youth in the Urban Environment).

King has an interdisciplinary background in psychology, education, counseling, anthropology, sociology, administration, planning and social policy. She specializes in the areas of cognitive developmental psychology/learning environments, research design and methodology, and program evaluation. Her book was published in 2008, “Enriching the Lives of Children: Creating Meaningful and Novel Stimulus Experiences to Promote Cognitive, Moral and Emotional Development,” Cambridge Scholars Publishing. King participated in the Oxford Roundtable on The Psychology of the Child at Oxford University in July 2006; and, was invited back during the summer of 2009 to participate in the Roundtable on Three Cultures: Humanities/Art, Science and Religion. She is currently working on a book, Psychology's Use and Representation of the Three Cultures in Understanding Human Nature: History, Perspectives and Portraits scheduled for publication in late 2012 or early 2013.
In June 2008, King studied at International Christian University and Sophia University in Tokyo, Japan on contemporary and popular Japanese culture and society from a historical perspective to the present time. She leads study tours abroad with students each year and has widely traveled and studied across the globe. Visit her website at: www.psyking.net.

Curtis F. Morgan
Professor of History, Lord Fairfax Community College


Curtis Morgan has taught World and U.S. History at LFCC since August 2000.  He earned his PhD in Modern European History from the University of South Carolina in 1998 and is the author of James F. Byrnes, Lucius Clay and American Policy in Germany, 1945-1947. He is also a Visiting Researcher in the Asian Studies Department at Georgetown University.  He is presently working on a biography of General Nathanael Greene, as well as a comparison of the land reform policies of Sun Yat-sen and Peter Stolypin.



David J. Smith
United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC


David J. Smith is USIP’s senior manager for educational outreach. Based in the Global Peacebuilding Center, he coordinates educational outreach activities for the center and institute wide. He works closely with educational and professional associations, academic institutions, and public groups to promote Institute objectives. He speaks frequently on a variety of issues including civil society and peace building, international education, and conflict resolution. He joined USIP in 2005.
As a Fulbright Scholar, Smith taught at the University of Tartu (Tartu, Estonia). He also taught at the undergraduate level at Harford Community College, Goucher College, Towson University and Stevenson University, and, currently, at the graduate level at George Mason University. Smith has worked in the fields of domestic and community conflict resolution, and as a practicing attorney. He has lectured on mediator practice in Sweden and India. Smith currently serves on the Rockville, Maryland, Human Rights Commission and has been published in the International Herald Tribune, Baltimore Sun and the Chronicle of Higher Education.
Smith holds a B.A. in political science and urban affairs from American University’s School of Public Affairs, an M.S. from George Mason University’s School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution and a J.D. from the University of Baltimore School Of Law. Visit his web page at: http://www.usip.org/experts/david-j-smith.

Dr. R. Lee Viar, IV, Professor, Business, Administration and Management
Community College Leadership, Colorado Technical University and Morgan State University

Lee Viar is an innovative teacher and author with a passion and devotion to education and learning. He has been a college instructor for 10+ years teaching at the undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral levels. He has over 20 years of professional marketing and business experience in the areas of banking and marketing management. He is also a published author whose works have been published in various academic journals and publications. Dr. Viar’s book, The Nontraditional Learner’s Guide to Success: Creating an Informal Support Network, focuses on the characteristics of the nontraditional learner and how they can identify and capitalize on the support they receive from their informal support network. Visit his website at: http://www.drleeviariv.com

Ms. Kasi Williams, MBA, Information Technology, Business Administration and Higher Education Administration, Morgan State University


Kasi Williams came to Morgan State University (MSU) 2006, after receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in Information Systems from Grambling State University, located in Grambling, Louisiana.  Her first degree of study at MSU was a Master of Business Administration, MBA, where she received concentration courses in Information Technology.  While receiving her MBA, she worked as a research/graduate assistant in the office of Undergraduate Admission & Recruitment where one of her first duties was to automate many of the manual processes that existed with the processing system in place.  Before joining the Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration program, at Morgan State University, she worked with different organizations, assisting each with technological needs, from web development to application development, such as Embarq, based in Overland Park, KS, Morgan State University’s office of Community and Economic Development, Baltimore Neighborhood Associations, and other non-profit organizations in the Baltimore area.  

She is currently active with the Morgan State University’s Web Communications team as well as the office of Community and Economic Development, where she acts as program coordinator to the Community Education Program, a program striving to bridge the technology and learning gaps between those individuals of various ages, social classes, and economic positions of Morgan State University’s surrounding community.

An important aspect of her life is family, community, and the learning and growth process for all types of learners.  


 Presenters
Sanaz Alasti
Sanaz Alasti is currently teaching at Lamar University.  Alasti has recently completed her Postdoctoral research at Harvard law school. She awarded a Fellowship from Harvard law school for her research on "Comparative Study of Capital Punishment: The Internal Critique," which examines criminal justice reform in the world. She has taught the following courses: Criminology, Legal Research, Legal Writing, Introduction to Criminal Justice System, Corrections, Organized Crime, and Gangs & Terrorism. She has worked at ACLU of Northern California and subsequently worked on a project analyzing the relationship between sentencing outcomes and racial characteristics in homicide cases charged and sentenced in Tulare County, CA at Habeas Corpus Resource Center. She has written numerous books and articles on various aspects of Comparative Criminal Justice & penology.

Ro’Shaun Bailey
Bailey holds the bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Mississippi Valley State U.  He has worked at MVSU and currently at Coppin State U. in student development. He is a Ph.D. student in Interdisciplinary Higher Education at MSU.  Both presenters have experience with the Upward Bound program. The program is part of the TRIO program managed by the U.S. Department of Education.

Steven Berizzi
Steven Berizzi was born in New York City and raised in Greenwich, Connecticut. He was educated in the Greenwich public schools, and at The Lawrenceville School, Harvard College, the Quinnipiac University School of Law, and Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.  He practiced law in the Connecticut courts from 1989 until 2001.  In 2002, he joined the faculty of Norwalk Community College, where he is now Professor, History & Political Science. He belongs to the Organization of American Historians, the Society of Civil War Historians, and the Civil War Roundtable of Fairfield County.

Julie Carvalho
Julie Carvalho began teaching in community colleges in 1987 and has taught at a dozen community or four-year colleges around the D.C. beltway.  In teaching psychology, sociology, communications, and other subjects, she has developed values modules and experiential scenarios to provide significant learning, as defined by Carl Rogers.  She is listed in Who’s Who in American for her professional and social justice advocacy work.

Laurie Fisher
Laurie Fisher has 29 years of experience with the American Red Cross, most recently supporting a nationwide education program to promote greater understanding of IHL. She is the Senior Associate, IHL Education, American Red Cross, Washington, DC.  She holds a Master’s Degree in International Management from the Thunderbird School of Global Management and undergraduate degrees in International Studies, Spanish and Latin American Studies from Dickinson College.

Sharon Ewell Foster
Foster is a former Defense Department instructor, writer, analyst, and logistician, is the only African American to win the Christy Award for her historical novel, Passing by Samaria, also chosen as the NAACP Book of the Year in 2000.  Born in Texas, raised in Illinois, she now resides in North Carolina.  She is a speaker, teacher, and author of seven previous books that have earned her a loyal following that crosses market, gender, and racial boundaries.  Foster has been a contributor to Daily Guideposts for over 10 years. Her most recent publications are The Truth about Nat Turner, published in TheRoot.com; Moonshine and Lies: The Truth about Nat Turner, published in EbonyJet.com; and The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Parts 1 and 2, published by Howard Books, a division of Simon & Schuster.

Dr. Ray Winbush, Director of Morgan State University's Urban Research Institute and consultant on the PBS film "Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property" says about Ewell’s book, "Every once in a while a book shakes the very foundation of what you believe like Alex Haley'sAutobiography of Malcolm X. . . . The Resurrection of Nat Turner is in that category.  Sharon Ewell Foster unearths the truth about Nat Turner and meticulously liberates his story. This is a liberating book, both psychologically and historically.  Read it, read again and then pass it on to someone who thinks they know the real Nat Turner"
Nelson J. Ginebra                                                                                                                                                                             
Nelson Ginebra has 25 years of experience in Film (16mm), Video, and Digital Media production at the Broadcast, Corporate/Educational, Cable and Independent levels. Nelson has over 8 years of instructional experience in Video Production and Digital Media Creation both at the college level and private sector level. He has Produced, Written, Directed and Edited independent films and videos as well as raised funding through grants and fellowships.
Screen/Broadcast credits and clients include, American Film Institute/Kennedy Center, PBS/WETA, Corcoran Gallery of Art, NBC News, Montgomery County Public Schools, Reuters Television, Univision, CNN Spanish, Whitman Walker Clinic, and various independent film/video festivals across the country. Nelson is an adjunct professor at Montgomery college teaching digital multi-media instruction. His history blog is located at www.ghostofherodotus.com.  Finally, he is a member of MENSA.

Karen Jolley
In 1986, Karen Jolley received a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Kennesaw State University in Marietta, Georgia.  In 1995, she received her Masters in Family Studies from Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. Her career experience in psychology includes: teaching adolescents with behavior disorders; substance abuse treatment with adolescents, adults, and families; child, adolescent, adult and family therapy; mental health crisis evaluation; crime victim advocacy; community education on crime victim's issues, particularly domestic violence, sexual assault, and other violent crimes; stress management/burnout prevention and intervention. Karen is currently pursuing her doctorate in Health Psychology through Northcentral University. Since March 2002, she has taught psychology courses full-time at Central Georgia Technical College in Macon, Georgia.

Adam Katz
Adam Katz is a junior at the George Washington University majoring in International Affairs.  He is co-Founder of Active Minds at the George Washington University, a chapter of the national organization Active Minds, Inc.,  which seeks to raise awareness about and destigmatize mental illness on college campuses.  He served as co-president of GWU’s chapter for two years, during which time the chapter won the “Chapter of the Year” award at Active Minds’ 2011 national conference.  In his spare time, he enjoys reading, jogging, listening to music, going to museums, and spending time with friends and family.  

Rosalyn M.  King
Rosalyn King is professor of psychology at NVCC-Loudoun and VCCS Chair, Center for Teaching Excellence, Northern Virginia Region. She is also adjunct research professor at Capella University in the graduate program in Advanced Studies in Human Behavior, Harold Abel School of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. King serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of ECCSSA. She received her doctoral training at Harvard University in Learning Environments, Administration, Planning and Social Policy, with special study in the Harvard Law School (Constitutional Law, Intellectual Property Law, Commerce and Development) and the School of Design (Youth in the Urban Environment).

King has an interdisciplinary background in psychology, education, counseling, anthropology, sociology, administration, planning and social policy. She specializes in the areas of cognitive developmental psychology/learning environments, research design and methodology, and program evaluation. Her book was published in 2008, “Enriching the Lives of Children: Creating Meaningful and Novel Stimulus Experiences to Promote Cognitive, Moral and Emotional Development,” Cambridge Scholars Publishing. King participated in the Oxford Roundtable on The Psychology of the Child at Oxford University in July 2006; and, was invited back during the summer of 2009 to participate in the Roundtable on Three Cultures: Humanities/Art, Science and Religion. She is currently working on a book, Psychology's Use and Representation of the Three Cultures in Understanding Human Nature: History, Perspectives and Portraits scheduled for publication in  late 2012 or early 2013.
In June 2008, King studied at International Christian University and Sophia University in Tokyo, Japan on contemporary and popular Japanese culture and society from a historical perspective to the present time. She leads study tours abroad with students each year and has widely traveled and studied across the globe. Visit her website at: www.psyking.net.

Illeah Lewis
Illeah Lewis is a full-time student at Liberty University. I am studying Business with specializations in Management and Marketing, and I thoroughly enjoy it. I would love to own my own business someday. I plan on achieving my master’s at some point after I complete my bachelor’s degree. I also work part-time at school, and hope to have an internship lined up for this summer. I strive for success and love to accomplish my goals by taking one step at a time. I will be teaming with my dad on this project.

Kevin Lewis
Kevin Lewis is the CEO/Managing Partner of LMK Partners LLC, a veteran-owned enterprise. His firm delivers services in the area of organizational improvement, productivity analysis, and human capital management. His career includes service as a combat arms officer in the U.S. Army and 30+ years in the competitive world of information technology, collaborative study research, and management consulting.

Breyette Lorntz
Breyette Lorntz has 20 years of experience teaching history, mathematics, global issues and health at elementary, secondary, post-secondary and graduate levels and holds a PhD. in Education from the University of Virginia. Within the American Red Cross Virginia Mountain Region, Dr. Lorntz  coordinates International Activities and serves as instructor of Health and Safety courses, International Humanitarian Law and Exploring Humanitarian Law.

John P. McGuinness
John McGuinness is currently beginning his third year of teaching as an adjunct professor at NOVA Annandale. He earned his MA in Philosophy at the University of Chicago and worked for the U.S. Government for 40 years as a Marine officer, Foreign Service Officer, Intelligence Officer, and finally (for 20 years) as a Foreign Affairs Officer, at the State Department.

Curtis F. Morgan
Curtis Morgan has taught World and U.S. History at LFCC since August 2000.  He earned his PhD in Modern European History from the University of South Carolina in 1998 and is the author of James F. Byrnes, Lucius Clay and American Policy in Germany, 1945-1947. He is also a Visiting Researcher in the Asian Studies Department at Georgetown University.  He is presently working on a biography of General Nathanael Greene, as well as a comparison of the land reform policies of Sun Yat-sen and Peter Stolypin.

Anny A. Ojekwe
Anny A. Ojekwe has been teaching at various colleges for over 10 years. She holds a Master’s degree in computer science and a Ph.D. in political science.  She is currently an adjunct faculty at NOVA and previously was Director of Education at a local private college.

Michael H.  Parsons
Parsons has worked as a faculty member, administrator and community developer for over 40 years. Currently he is a visiting adjunct professor in the Community College Leadership Ed.D  program and the Interdisciplinary Higher Education Ph.D. program at Morgan State U. (MSU)

David L. Strickland
David L. Strickland is Associate Professor of Sociology at East Georgia College. Prior to teaching sociology he conducted grant funded health care research at the Center for Rural Health and Research at Georgia Southern University, and has published numerous articles and chapters on the sociology of health care. He has been a pioneer in the area of online instruction and served as an author for the e-Core version of Introduction to Sociology which is used by the 34 Institution University System of Georgia. He was a co-author of the freshman orientation course textbook at East Georgia College, Student Success and most recently an Introduction to Sociology textbook, My Sociology, which was designed to transform the culture of learning.

Huiyun Tang
Huiyun Tang, is a visiting scholar at the University of Virginia, political science department). She is a PhD candidate at the East China Normal University , China. She holds a M.A. in International Studies, School of Advanced International and Area Studies,  ECNU; and a Bachelor Degree of Law, Department of Political Science and Law, Lu Dong University  Her areas of research specialization are American Immigration policy  and International Relations.


Ian Taylor
Ian Taylor currently teaches Survey of Economics and Principles of Micro/Macroeconomics courses for the Virginia Community College System.  He has a passion for integrating technology into the classroom and sharing the new found process with peers. Visit his website at: www.itseconomics.com.

José G. Vargas-Hernández               
José G. Vargas-Hernández is Research Professor at the University Center for Economic and Managerial Sciences, University of Guadalajara. He is a member of the National System of Researchers of Mexico.  He is a Visiting Scholar IURD at UC Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration and a Ph.D. in Economics and Studies in Organisational Behaviour.  He has a Master of Business Administration and a Bachelor’s in Commercial Relations.  He has received awards from Global Strategic Management, Inc. in Washington, D.C. (2009); Academia de Ciencias Administrativas, México (2007); Global Business and Economic Development (2004); and, Allies Academies, International Business Academy (2002).



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